PTSD in Military Veterans - HelpGuide.org (2023)

For all too many veterans, returning from military service means coping with symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. But there are things you can do to start feeling better today.

PTSD in Military Veterans - HelpGuide.org (1)

Understanding PTSD in veterans

Are you having a hard time readjusting to life out of the military? Are you always on edge, always on the verge of panicking or exploding, or, on the flip side, do you feel emotionally numb and disconnected from your loved ones? Do you believe that you’ll never feel normal again?

For all too many veterans, these are common experiences—lingering symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It’s hard living with untreated PTSD and, with long V.A. wait times, it’s easy to get discouraged. But you can feel better, and you can start today, even while you’re waiting for professional treatment. There are many things you can do to help yourself overcome PTSD and come out the other side even stronger than before.

What causes PTSD?

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), sometimes known as shell shock or combat stress, occurs after you experience severe trauma or a life-threatening event. It's normal for your mind and body to be in shock after such an event, but this normal response becomes PTSD when your nervous system gets “stuck.”

Your nervous system has two automatic or reflexive ways of responding to stressful events:

Mobilization, or fight-or-flight, occurs when you need to defend yourself or survive the danger of a combat situation. Your heart pounds faster, your blood pressure rises, and your muscles tighten, increasing your strength and reaction speed. Once the danger has passed, your nervous system calms your body, lowering your heart rate and blood pressure, and winding back down to its normal balance.

Immobilization occurs when you've experienced too much stress in a situation and even though the danger has passed, you find yourself “stuck.” Your nervous system is unable to return to its normal state of balance and you're unable to move on from the event. This is PTSD.

Recovering from PTSD involves transitioning out of the mental and emotional war zone you're still living in and helping your nervous system become “unstuck.”

Symptoms of PTSD in veterans

While you can develop symptoms of PTSD in the hours or days following a traumatic event, sometimes symptoms don't surface for months or even years after you return from deployment. While PTSD develops differently in each veteran, there are four symptom clusters:

  1. Recurrent, intrusive reminders of the traumatic event, including distressing thoughts, nightmares, and flashbacks where you feel like the event is happening again. You may experience extreme emotional and physical reactions to reminders of the trauma such as panic attacks, uncontrollable shaking, and heart palpitations.
  2. Extreme avoidance of things that remind you of the traumatic event, including people, places, thoughts, or situations you associate with the bad memories. This includes withdrawing from friends and family and losing interest in everyday activities.
  3. Negative changes in your thoughts and mood, such as exaggerated negative beliefs about yourself or the world and persistent feelings of fear, guilt, or shame. You may notice a diminished ability to experience positive emotions.
  4. Being on guard all the time, jumpy, and emotionally reactive, as indicated by irritability, anger, reckless behavior, difficulty sleeping, trouble concentrating, and hypervigilance (increased alertness).

Suicide prevention in veterans with PTSD

It's common for veterans with PTSD to experience suicidal thoughts. Feeling suicidal is not a character defect, and it doesn't mean that you are crazy, weak, or flawed.

If you are thinking about taking your own life, seek help immediately. Please read Suicide Help, talk to someone you trust, or call a suicide helpline:

  • In the U.S., call 1-800-273-TALK (8255).
  • In the UK, call 08457 90 90 90.
  • In Australia, call 13 11 14.
  • Or visit IASP to find a helpline in your country.

PTSD risk factors

We don’t know why some soldiers develop PTSD and others don’t, but we do know that the incidence goes up with the number of tours and the amount of combat you experienced. This isn’t surprising, considering many symptoms of PTSD—like hypervigilance, hyperawareness, and adrenaline-quick reflexes—helped you survive when you were deployed. It’s only now that you’re back home that these responses are inappropriate.

Learning how to become “unstuck” won't happen overnight, but if you take it day by day, you’ll soon see progress. And as you learn how to deal with your combat stress, you’ll also be learning skills that will translate into success in the rest of your life—tools you can use for much more than overcoming PTSD.

PTSD in veterans recovery step 1: Get moving

Getting regular exercise has always been key for veterans with PTSD. As well as helping to burn off adrenaline, exercise can release endorphins and improve your mood. And byreally focusing on your body as you exercise, you can even help your nervous system become unstuck and move out of the immobilization stress response.

Exercise that is rhythmic and engages both your arms and legs—such as running, swimming, basketball, or even dancing—works well if, instead of continuing to focus on your thoughts as you move, you focus on how your body feels.

Try to notice the sensation of your feet hitting the ground, for example, or the rhythm of your breathing, or the feeling of the wind on your skin. Many veterans with PTSD find that sports such as rock climbing, boxing, weight training, and martial arts make it easier to focus on your body movements—after all, if you don't, you could injure yourself. Whatever exercise you choose, try to work out for 30 minutes or more each day—or if it's easier, three 10-minute spurts of exercise are just as beneficial.

The benefits of the great outdoors

Pursuing outdoor activities in nature like hiking, camping, mountain biking, rock climbing, whitewater rafting, and skiing can help challenge your sense of vulnerability and help you transition back into civilian life.

Seek out local organizations that offer outdoor recreation or team-building opportunities, or, in the U.S., check out Sierra Club Military Outdoors. This program provides service members, veterans, and their families with opportunities to get out into nature and get moving.

Step 2: Self-regulate your nervous system

PTSD can leave you feeling vulnerable and helpless. But you have more control over your nervous system than you may realize. When you feel agitated, anxious, or out of control, these tips can help you change your arousal system and calm yourself.

Mindful breathing. To quickly calm yourself in any situation, simply take 60 breaths, focusing your attention on each ‘out' breath. Or you can use this guided Mindful Breathing Meditation.

(Video) Info on PTSD

Sensory input. Just as loud noises, certain smells, or the feel of sand in your clothes can instantly transport you back to the combat zone, so too can sensory input quickly calm you. Everyone responds a little differently, so experiment to find what works best for you. Think back to your time on deployment: what brought you comfort at the end of the day? Perhaps it was looking at photos of your family? Or listening to a favorite song, or smelling a certain brand of soap? Or maybe petting an animal quickly makes you feel calm?

Reconnect emotionally. It’s normal to want to avoid remembering or re-experiencing what you went through in combat. But the problem is that avoiding those memories doesn’t make them go away. In fact, when you try to suppress them, the thoughts, images, and dreams can actually become more threatening and intrusive. The only way to heal and move on is to reconnect to what you feel. This can be a terrifying step, but you can learn to reconnect with even the most uncomfortable emotions without becoming overwhelmed. See our Emotional Intelligence Toolkit.

Create a “safe” space

As a survivor of a war zone, you already know that the world can be a dangerous place at times. The problem with PTSD is that it makes you feel as if you’re still in danger, even when you’re not. By creating your own safe place (ideally someplace close and convenient), you can have a secure place to retreat to when you need to relax, meditate, or work through traumatic memories.

The safe place should be a secure, private location with limited access—somewhere you don’t have to worry about outside dangers or others intruding. Maybe it’s your bedroom or your office. Or it could be a corner of your back yard or an isolated spot outdoors. Make sure it’s calm and clean (no stressful paperwork, unfinished projects, or messes to distract you). You might want to add things that help you relax and make you feel good: plants, photos of loved ones, or a poster of a favorite place, for example.

Step 3: Connect with others

Connecting with others face to face doesn't have to include a lot of talking. For any veteran with PTSD, it's important to find someone who will listen without judging when you want to talk, or just hang out with you when you don't. That person may be your significant other, a family member, one of your buddies from the service, or a civilian friend. Or try:

Volunteering your time for a cause that's important to you or reaching out to someone in need. This is a great way to both connect to others and reclaim your sense of power.

Joining a PTSD support group. Connecting with other veterans facing similar problems can help you feel less isolated and provide useful tips on how to cope with symptoms and work towards recovery.

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Connecting with civilians

You may feel like the civilians in your life can't understand you since they haven't been in the service or seen what you have. But people don't have to have gone through the exact same experiences to relate to painful emotions and be able to offer support. What matters is that the person you're turning to cares about you, is a good listener, and a source of comfort.

You don't have to talk about your combat experiences. If you're not ready to open up about the details of what happened, that's perfectly okay. You can talk about how you feel without going into a blow-by-blow account of events.

Tell the other person what you need or how they can help. That could be just sitting with you, listening, or doing something practical. Comfort comes from someone else understanding your emotional experience.

People who care about you want to help. Listening is not a burden for them but a welcome opportunity to provide support.

(Video) PTSD from the war over Rambo

Step 4: Take care of your body

The symptoms of PTSD, such as insomnia, anger, concentration problems, and jumpiness, can be hard on your body and eventually take a toll on your overall health. That's why it's so important to take care of yourself.

You may be drawn to activities and behaviors that pump up adrenaline, whether it's caffeine, drugs, violent video games, driving recklessly, or daredevil sports. After being in a combat zone, that's what feels normal. But if you recognize these urges for what they are, you can make better choices that will calm and protect your body—and your mind.

Take time to relax. Relaxation techniques such as massage, meditation, or yoga can reduce stress, ease the symptoms of anxiety and depression, help you sleep better, and increase feelings of peace and well-being.

Find safe ways to blow off steam. Pound on a punching bag, pummel a pillow, go for a hard run, sing along to loud music, or find a secluded place to scream at the top of your lungs.

Support your body with a healthy diet. Omega-3s play a vital role in emotional health so incorporate foods such as fatty fish, flaxseed, and walnuts into your diet. Limit processed and fried food, sugars, and refined carbs which can exacerbate mood swings and energy fluctuations.

Get plenty of sleep. Sleep deprivation exacerbates anger, irritability, and moodiness. Aim for 7 to 9 hours of quality sleep each night. Develop a relaxing bedtime ritual (listen to calming music, take a hot shower, or read something light and entertaining), turn off screens at least one hour before bedtime, and make your bedroom as dark and quiet as possible.

Avoid alcohol and drugs (including nicotine). It can be tempting to turn to drugs and alcohol to numb painful memories and get to sleep. But substance abuse can make the symptoms of PTSD worse. The same applies to cigarettes. If possible, stop smoking and seek help for drinking and drug problems.

Step 5: Deal with flashbacks, nightmares, and intrusive thoughts

For veterans with PTSD, flashbacks usually involve visual and auditory memories of combat. It feels as if it's happening all over again so it's vital to reassure yourself that the experience is not occurring in the present. Trauma specialists call this “dual awareness.”

Dual awareness is the recognition that there is a difference between your “experiencing self” and your “observing self.” On the one hand, there is your internal emotional reality: you feel as if the trauma is currently happening. On the other hand, you can look to your external environment and recognize that you're safe. You're aware that despite what you're experiencing, the trauma happened in the past. It is not happening now.

State to yourself (out loud or in your head) the reality that while you feel as if the trauma is currently happening, you can look around and recognize that you're safe.

Use a simple script when you awaken from a nightmare or start to experience a flashback: “I feel [panicked, frightened, overwhelmed, etc.] because I'm remembering [traumatic event], but as I look around I can see that the event isn't happening right now and I'm not in danger.”

Describe what you see when you look around (name the place where you are, the current date, and three things you see when you look around).

Try tapping your arms as you describe what you see to help bring you back to the present.

Tips for grounding yourself during a flashback:

If you're starting to disassociate or experience a flashback, try using your senses to bring you back to the present and “ground” yourself. Experiment to find what works best for you.

Movement. Move around vigorously (run in place, jump up and down, etc.); rub your hands together; shake your head

Touch. Splash cold water on your face; grip a piece of ice; touch or grab on to a safe object; pinch yourself; play with worry beads or a stress ball

Sight. Blink rapidly and firmly; look around and take inventory of what you see

Sound. Turn on loud music; clap your hands or stomp your feet; talk to yourself (tell yourself you're safe, and that you'll be okay)

Smell. Smell something that links you to the present (coffee, mouthwash, your significant other’s perfume or cologne) or a scent that recalls good memories

Taste. Suck on a strong mint or chew a piece of gum; bite into something tart or spicy; drink a glass of cold water or juice

Step 6: Work through survivor's guilt

Feelings of guilt are very common among veterans with PTSD. You may have seen people injured or killed, often your friends and comrades. In the heat of the moment, you don't have time to fully process these events as they happen. But later—often when you've returned home—these experiences come back to haunt you. You may ask yourself questions such as:

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  • Why didn't I get hurt?
  • Why did I survive when others didn't?
  • Could I have done something differently to save them?

You may end up blaming yourself for what happened and believing that your actions (or inability to act) led to someone else's death. You may feel like others deserved to live more than you—that you're the one who should have died.This is survivor's guilt.

Recovering from survivor's guilt

Healing doesn't mean that you'll forget what happened or those who died. And it doesn't mean you'll have no regrets. What it does mean is that you'll view your role more realistically.

  • Is the amount of responsibility you're assuming reasonable?
  • Could you really have prevented or stopped what happened?
  • Are you judging your decisions based on complete information about the event, or just your emotions?
  • Did you do your best at the time, under challenging circumstances?
  • Do you truly believe that if you had died, someone else would have survived?

Honestly assessing your responsibility and role can free you to move on and grieve your losses. Even if you continue to feel some guilt, instead of punishing yourself, you can redirect your energy into honoring those you lost and finding ways to keep their memory alive. For example, you could volunteer for a cause that's connected in some way to one of the friends you lost. The goal is to put your guilt to positive use and thus transform a tragedy, even in a small way, into something worthwhile.

Step 7: Seek professional treatment

Professional treatment for PTSD can help you confront what happened to you and learn to accept it as a part of your past. When working with an experienced therapist or doctor, treatment may involve:

Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) or counseling. This involves gradually “exposing” yourself to thoughts and feelings that remind you of the event. Therapy also involves identifying distorted and irrational thoughts about the event—and replacing them with a more balanced picture.

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR). This incorporates elements of CBT with eye movements or other rhythmic, left-right stimulation such as hand taps or sounds. These can help your nervous system become “unstuck” and move on from the traumatic event.

[Read: EMDR Therapy for Trauma, PTSD, Anxiety, and Panic]

Medication. While medication, such as antidepressants, may help you feel less sad, worried, or on edge, it doesn't treat the causes of PTSD.

Helping a veteran with PTSD

When a loved one returns from military service with PTSD, it can take a heavy toll on your relationship and family life. You may have to take on a bigger share of household tasks, deal with the frustration of a loved one who won't open up, or even deal with anger or other disturbing behavior.

Don't take the symptoms of PTSD personally. If your loved one seems distant, irritable, angry, or closed off, remember that this may not have anything to do with you or your relationship.

Don't pressure your loved one into talking. Many veterans with PTSD find it difficult to talk about their experiences. Never try to force your loved one to open up but let them know that you're there if they want to talk. It's your understanding that provides comfort, not anything you say.

Be patient and understanding.Feeling better takes time so be patient with the pace of recovery. Offer support but don't try to direct your loved one.

Try to anticipate and prepare for PTSD triggers such as certain sounds, sights, or smells. If you are aware of what causes an upsetting reaction, you'll be in a better position to help your loved one calm down.

Take care of yourself. Letting your loved one's PTSD dominate your life while ignoring your own needs is a surefire recipe for burnout. Make time for yourself and learn to manage stress. The more calm, relaxed, and focused you are, the better you'll be able to help your loved one.

Authors: Melinda Smith, M.A., Lawrence Robinson, and Jeanne Segal, Ph.D.

Get more help

National Center for PTSD– A resource for veterans with PTSD and their family members. (U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs)

Understanding PTSD and PTSD Treatment(PDF) – Includes treatment and therapy options. (National Center for PTSD)

About Face– Learn about PTSD, hear real stories from other veterans, and get advice from experienced clinicians. (U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs)

Helplines and support

In the U.S.: Call the Veterans Crisis Lineat 1-800-273-8255 (Press 1); call the Veteran Center Call Centerhotline to talk with another combat veteran at 1-877-927-8387; or use the PTSD Program Locatorto find specialized VA PTSD treatment.

UK: VisitCombat Stressor call the 24-hour helpline 0800 138 1619.

Canada: Visit Operational Stress Injury Social Support (OSISS)for a local number to talk to a peer who has been through similar experiences.

Australia: VisitVeterans and Veterans Families Counselling Service (VVCS)or call 1800 011 046.

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Last updated: October 7, 2022

FAQs

What are the 4 symptoms of PTSD common in veterans? ›

What Are the Symptoms of PTSD?
  • Reliving the event (also called re-experiencing symptoms). Memories of the traumatic event can come back at any time. ...
  • Avoiding things that remind you of the event. ...
  • Having more negative thoughts and feelings than before the event. ...
  • Feeling on edge or keyed up (also called hyperarousal).
22 Sept 2022

Is there a PTSD questionnaire? ›

The PCL-5 is a 20-item questionnaire, corresponding to the DSM-5 symptom criteria for PTSD. The wording of PCL-5 items reflects both changes to existing symptoms and the addition of new symptoms in DSM-5.

What does PTSD look like in veterans? ›

Many older Veterans find they have PTSD symptoms even 50 or more years after their wartime experience. Some symptoms of PTSD include having nightmares or feeling like you are reliving the event, avoiding situations that remind you of the event, being easily startled, and loss of interest in activities.

What is the most common VA rating for PTSD? ›

VA DISABILITY PTSD RATING LEVELS
  • 10% For a 10% rating, the aforementioned symptoms are transient or sporadic. ...
  • 30% This disability rating is perhaps the most common one. ...
  • 50% The first two ratings focus on overall effects. ...
  • 70% At this level, you are likely struggling with maintaining employment. ...
  • 100%

What disability rating does the VA give for PTSD? ›

PTSD disability ratings can be 10%, 30%, 50%, 70%, or 100%. Transparency about your worst symptoms is vital for your rating. VA often rates veterans by the average of their symptoms. So, if a veteran has such symptoms that fall in the 30, 50, and 70% PTSD rating ranges, they will often get a 50% PTSD rating.

What do I say to get 70 PTSD compensation? ›

70% PTSD Rating Criteria

Speech intermittently illogical, obscure, or irrelevant. Near-continuous panic or depression affects the ability to function independently, appropriately, and effectively. Impaired impulse control (such as unprovoked irritability with periods of violence) Spatial disorientation.

What is the gold standard for PTSD assessment? ›

The CAPS is the gold standard in PTSD assessment. The CAPS-5 is a 30-item structured interview that can be used to: Make current (past month) diagnosis of PTSD.

How do you prove PTSD? ›

To be diagnosed with PTSD, an adult must have all of the following for at least 1 month:
  1. At least one re-experiencing symptom.
  2. At least one avoidance symptom.
  3. At least two arousal and reactivity symptoms.
  4. At least two cognition and mood symptoms.

What do veterans with PTSD struggle with? ›

Persistent negative emotions – Veterans who experience PTSD can be overwhelmed by negative feelings. A veteran may also feel difficulty establishing trust, experience feelings of guilt, shame, remorse, disinterest in previously enjoyable activities, or genuinely find it hard to feel happy.

What can make PTSD worse? ›

Triggers can include sights, sounds, smells, or thoughts that remind you of the traumatic event in some way. Some PTSD triggers are obvious, such as seeing a news report of an assault. Others are less clear. For example, if you were attacked on a sunny day, seeing a bright blue sky might make you upset.

What do PTSD people see? ›

People with PTSD have intense, disturbing thoughts and feelings related to their experience that last long after the traumatic event has ended. They may relive the event through flashbacks or nightmares; they may feel sadness, fear or anger; and they may feel detached or estranged from other people.

How do you make a PTSD person happy? ›

Here are nine different ways you can help a loved one with PTSD.
  1. Educate Yourself on PTSD. This condition tends to be misunderstood, and there's often a stigma attached to it. ...
  2. Be Supportive. ...
  3. Be Patient (Don't Pressure Them) ...
  4. Listen. ...
  5. Don't Judge. ...
  6. Show Respect. ...
  7. Learn About Their Triggers. ...
  8. Encourage Them to Seek Treatment.
26 May 2022

Why are people with PTSD angry? ›

If you have PTSD, you may be more likely to react to any stress with "full activation." You may react as if your life or self were threatened. This automatic response of irritability and anger in those with PTSD can create serious problems in the workplace and in family life.

What does a complex PTSD episode look like? ›

Symptoms of complex PTSD

avoiding situations that remind a person of the trauma. dizziness or nausea when remembering the trauma. hyperarousal, which means being in a continual state of high alert. the belief that the world is a dangerous place.

Does VA rate PTSD and anxiety together? ›

Be aware, however, that a veteran cannot receive separate ratings for all three conditions (anxiety, depression, and PTSD) since they are all rated under the same rating criteria, as this is called pyramiding.

Is 70% PTSD a permanent VA disability? ›

Yes, PTSD is considered a permanent VA disability. The Department of Veteran Affairs recognizes post-traumatic stress disorder as a serious, life-altering mental condition and will award disability benefits to qualified veterans suffering from PTSD.

Is PTSD permanent disability? ›

The veteran's total disability due to PTSD is permanent with no likelihood of improvement. The 100 percent rating for PTSD is total, permanent, and static in nature.

How do I know if my PTSD C&P exam went well? ›

The best, and often only, way to tell if a C&P exam went well for the veteran is to read the exam report. However, VA does not issue the veteran a copy of the report unless they specifically request it. To do this, veterans can send a letter requesting a copy of their exam report to their Regional Office.

Can you get 100 disability for PTSD and still work? ›

Yes! You can still work with a 100 percent scheduler PTSD rating. Veterans with a 100 VA disability from the VA for PTSD also qualify for Special Monthly Compensation.

What is an example of grossly inappropriate behavior? ›

Grossly inappropriate behavior could include intermittent memory loss, suicidal ideation, or the persistent danger of hurting yourself or others.

What are 5 PTSD symptoms? ›

Common symptoms of PTSD
  • vivid flashbacks (feeling like the trauma is happening right now)
  • intrusive thoughts or images.
  • nightmares.
  • intense distress at real or symbolic reminders of the trauma.
  • physical sensations such as pain, sweating, nausea or trembling.

What are 3 possible symptoms of PTSD? ›

The main symptoms and behaviours associated with PTSD and complex PTSD include: Reliving the experience through flashbacks, intrusive memories, or nightmares. Overwhelming emotions with the flashbacks, memories, or nightmares. Not being able to feel emotions or feeling “numb”

What are the 5 criteria of PTSD? ›

Frequently Asked Questions. What is the DSM-5 criteria for PTSD? The DSM-5 criteria for PTSD include, first, direct or indirect exposure to a traumatic event, followed by symptoms in four categories: intrusion, avoidance, negative changes in thoughts and mood, and changes in arousal and reactivity.

What is the biggest symptom of PTSD? ›

Avoidance and emotional numbing

Trying to avoid being reminded of the traumatic event is another key symptom of PTSD. This usually means avoiding certain people or places that remind you of the trauma, or avoiding talking to anyone about your experience.

What does PTSD do to the brain? ›

PTSD causes your brain to get stuck in danger mode. Even after you're no longer in danger, it stays on high alert. Your body continues to send out stress signals, which lead to PTSD symptoms. Studies show that the part of the brain that handles fear and emotion (the amygdala) is more active in people with PTSD.

How do you prove PTSD? ›

To be diagnosed with PTSD, an adult must have all of the following for at least 1 month:
  1. At least one re-experiencing symptom.
  2. At least one avoidance symptom.
  3. At least two arousal and reactivity symptoms.
  4. At least two cognition and mood symptoms.

What should you not say to a complex PTSD? ›

10 Things Not To Say To Someone With CPTSD
  • It wasn't that bad, was it?
  • That happened in the past, why are you still upset?
  • Calm down.
  • You're overreacting. It's been years now. Get over it.
  • You're too much right now.
  • What's wrong with you?
  • I don't believe anything you're saying.
  • You are crazy. You are dramatic.

What part of the body does PTSD affect? ›

Changes in the brain

One part of the brain responsible for memory and emotions is known as the hippocampus. In people with PTSD, the hippocampus appears smaller in size. It's thought that changes in this part of the brain may be related to fear and anxiety, memory problems and flashbacks.

What are 2 things that can happen to you if you have PTSD? ›

People who have PTSD or who are exposed to trauma also may experience panic disorder, depression, substance use, or suicidal thoughts. Treatment for these conditions can help with recovery after trauma.

What are common PTSD triggers? ›

With PTSD, a trigger is something that brings on memories or reminders of a traumatic event.
...
Many different things can trigger your PTSD symptoms, such as:
  • Visual images.
  • Noise.
  • Smells.
  • Colors.
  • Food.
  • Even the weather.
27 Sept 2021

What are the lesser known signs of PTSD? ›

Four Lesser-Known PTSD Symptoms
  • Body Dysmorphia. Obsessive thoughts about one's appearance characterise body dysmorphia or body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). ...
  • Physical Pain and PTSD. PTSD shouldn't just be thought of as another mental health condition. ...
  • Withdrawing Socially and PTSD. ...
  • To Conclude.
11 Sept 2021

What is the best assessment tool for PTSD? ›

The Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist (PCL-5) is a 20-item self-report tool that corresponds to the 20 symptoms listed in DSM-5 (Blevins et al., 2015). It can provide a global assessment of PTSD severity both at the time of diagnosis and over the course of treatment.

What are the symptoms of complex PTSD? ›

What is complex PTSD?
  • difficulty controlling your emotions.
  • feeling very angry or distrustful towards the world.
  • constant feelings of emptiness or hopelessness.
  • feeling as if you are permanently damaged or worthless.
  • feeling as if you are completely different to other people.

What does a severe PTSD episode look like? ›

Recurrent, unwanted distressing memories of the traumatic event. Reliving the traumatic event as if it were happening again (flashbacks) Upsetting dreams or nightmares about the traumatic event. Severe emotional distress or physical reactions to something that reminds you of the traumatic event.

What does PTSD feel like physically? ›

People with PTSD may also experience physical symptoms, such as increased blood pressure and heart rate, fatigue, muscle tension, nausea, joint pain, headaches, back pain or other types of pain. The person in pain may not realize the connection between their pain and a traumatic event.

What are the 12 signs of PTSD? ›

What are the 17 Symptoms of PTSD?
  • Intrusive Thoughts. Intrusive thoughts are perhaps the best-known symptom of PTSD. ...
  • Nightmares. ...
  • Avoiding Reminders of the Event. ...
  • Memory Loss. ...
  • Negative Thoughts About Self and the World. ...
  • Self-Isolation; Feeling Distant. ...
  • Anger and Irritability. ...
  • Reduced Interest in Favorite Activities.
14 Jun 2021

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